Blog Archives

Mind Your Own Life: Author Aaron Anson Discusses His Book

Author Arthur Anson. Photo courtesy Oliver Anson.

What is the overall message that you would like your readers to gain from your book?

My book is about engaging our own minds to seek and reconcile our own truths with God, or the source that created us all. It is not as important as we’ve been taught to give names to the unnameable, but more important to recognize that we came into existence instinctively knowing only love, and our beliefs and inherited prejudices were taught to us by others who in turn had those beliefs instilled and taught to them as well.

What can people 50 and over learn from “Mind Your Own Life”?

This journey back to love is one we can begin at any point in our lives. We cannot be held captive to the truths of others. We should reconcile for ourselves, and when we know a truth is inherently ours and agrees with us we should hold steadfast to our own knowing. We can acknowledge how we have passed down our own taught beliefs to others after us and how our inherited beliefs has affected our relationship with those we profess to love. If we can see where we came from, we can better understand where we are going and perhaps objectively encourage others more positively. More families, marriages and relationships have been destroyed in the name of religion then we care to admit.

To Read Full Story, Please Click Here –> Mind Your Own Life, Interview with Aaron Anson — AARP.

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How Your Greatest Insecurities Reveal Your Deepest Gifts

Your Core Gifts:The Powerful, Unexpected Path To Love

By Ken Page, LCSW in Finding Love

In my decades of practice as a psychotherapist, this is the insight that has inspired me most:

Our deepest wounds surround our greatest gifts.

I’ve found that the very qualities we’re most ashamed of, the ones we keep trying to reshape or hide, are in fact the key to finding real love. I call them core gifts.

It’s so easy to get lost in the quest for self-improvement. Every billboard seduces us with the vision of a happier, more successful life. I’m suggesting an opposite road to happiness. If we can name our own awkward, ardent gifts, and extricate them from the shame and wounds that keep them buried, we’ll find ourselves on a bullet train to deep, surprising, life-changing intimacy.

Over the years, I realized that the characteristics of my clients which I found most inspiring, most essentially them, were the ones which frequently caused them the most suffering.  Some clients would complain of feeling like they were “too much”; too intense, too angry, or too demanding. From my therapist’s chair, I would see a passion so powerful that it frightened people away.

TO READ FULL ARTICLE, CLICK HERE –>  Psychology Today.