Blog Archives

NOTICE on MANAGED LONG TERM CARE PLAN

On June 6, 2012, the N.Y. State Department of Health released on its website copies of the first mailing that will be sent to consumers affected by the mandatory MLTC initiative.

As revealed in an Advisory Group conference call on May 31, the State is not waiting for CMS approval of its waiver amendment before starting its communications to consumers.  This letter is purportedly being mailed this week to Manhattan recipients of Personal Care Services residing below Central Park.  Here is an excerpt from the letter:

This is an important notice from the Medicaid Program. We are writing because you get home care or other long-term care services. The way you get these services will change in the next several months. To keep receiving your services, you will be required to join a Managed Long Term Care Plan.

The requirement that you must join a Plan is subject to approval by the federal Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS). You do not need to do anything at this time. This letter is to tell you what this change means to you and how it will happen.

The mailing includes a list of all MLTC plans, including MAP and PACE.  It also includes the toll-free number of the enrollment broker, NY Medicaid Choice, for consumers to call with questions about MLTC: 888-401-6582.

The mailing with be sent in English and Spanish and also includes a card in 18 languages instructing people to call the toll-free number for assistance in their language.

As far as we know, this does not change the previously proposed implementation timeline.

Valerie Bogart

Selfhelp Community Services

10 Tips For Finding The Right Doctor

By Lissa Rankin

If you weren’t getting what you needed from your massage therapist, hairdresser, or yoga instructor, you would find someone else, right?  Why should your doctor be any different?  And yet, your doctor is even more important.  This is serious stuff we’re talking about here.

Plus, medicine is, after all, a spiritual practice.  At least it should be, and if your doctor doesn’t believe that, do you really want to put your body and your life in his or her hands?  If you didn’t like your priest, minister, guru, or shaman, you would go elsewhere, right?  It’s your body.  Your health. Your life. Your choice.

Ms. Rankin suggests you: Seek someone who shares your beliefs … Be willing to get what you pay for… Demand what you deserve … Listen to your intuition … Feel the love … Know that you deserve the best care possible.

TO READ LIST OF TIPS, JUST CLICK THIS LINK –> 10 Tips To Help You Find The Right Doctor | Care2 Healthy Living.

HOW MEDICARE FAILS THE ELDERLY (nytimes.com)

By Jane Gross

(Published Oct. 15, 2011)

HERE is the dirty little secret of health care in America for the elderly, the one group we all assume has universal coverage thanks to the 1965 Medicare law: what Medicare paid for then is no longer what recipients need or want today.

No one then envisioned the stunning advances in medicine that now keep people alive into advanced old age, often with unintended and unwelcome consequences. Indeed, scientific reports have showed the dangers, not merely the pointlessness and expense, of much of the care Medicare is providing.

Of course, some may actually want everything medical science has to offer. But overwhelmingly, I’ve concluded in a decade of studying America’s elderly, it is fee-for-service doctors and Big Pharma who stand to gain the most, and adult children, with too much emotion and too little information, driving those decisions.

In the last year alone, and this list is far from complete, here is what researchers have found both useless and harmful, according to leading medical journals:

• Feeding tubes, which can cause infections, nausea and vomiting, rarely prolong life. People with dementia often react with agitation, including pulling out the tubes, and then are either sedated or restrained.

• Abdominal and gall bladder surgery and joint replacements, for those who rank poorly on a scale that measures frailty, lead to complications, repeat hospital stays and placement in nursing homes.

• Tight glycemic control for Type 2 diabetes, present in 1 of 4 people over 65, often requires 8 to 10 years before it helps prevent blindness, kidney disease or amputations. Without enough time to reap the benefits, the elderly endure needless dietary limits and needle sticks.

TO READ FULL ESSAY CLICK HERE –> How Medicare Fails the Elderly – NYTimes.com.