Category Archives: Keeping Active

CRITICAL ESSAYS ON AGING LGBT ELDERS OF COLOR

Good day all,

What a wonderful way for us to celebrate this day that is all too often overshadowed by consumer purchases of messages of love.

Here, we have added to the literature and resources concerning the lives of those who are often not considered within prevailing hegemonic notions of who we love.  (For all Morganites: Tiffany Rice, one of our doctoral candidates, contributed to this suite of articles I had the pleasure of curating.)

Our work has been posted to American Society on Agings website.

Yes we did.

I trust that this small contribution, viewable via the following links, will add dimension to the stories of People of Color Lesbian Gay Trangender and Bisexual elders in  communities.

We are part of the task of dismantling the master’s house (see Audre Lorde):

>>  Dying with Dignity: Considerations for Treating Elder Transgender People of Color

>>  Cervical Cancer in Elder Black Lesbian and Bisexual Women

>>  Reducing Isolation: A Community Engagement Service Model

>>  Reticence and Necessity: Power of Attorney and LGBT Aging Issues

>>  (Dis)parities and (In)visibilities: Shifting Perception of the Life Course of LGBT Elders of Color

Thanks All!!

Laurens

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New SAGE Center Honors Elders

 

Black Pride New York City honored its Elders on August 16th, 2012 at the new Sage Center on 305 7th Avenue.

The  assembly of speakers came for across the city to honor the LGBT POC Elder community.  Over 75 seniors came to­gether for an evening of community, live entertainment and lunch, all generously donated.

A special tribute was paid to GRIOT Circle and its executive director, Glen-Michael Francis, who was also the keynote speaker. Glen spoke about community and the work that went into creating the Sage Innovative Center, the first city-funded LGBT Center in New York City. 

Glen also spoke to why this community center belongs to all of us, and why we as people of color should come and enjoy the activities, make sug­gestions to create programs and services that are reflective of our values and traditions, bring friends and take computer classes

Alyce Emory, the evening’s MC and program coordina­tor, said, “I am humbled and grateful to all who participated and supported!”  Minister Renair Amin was the officiant and gave the opening remarks and blessings!

 

BLACK HISTORY MONTH AT GRIOT CIRCLE

TO ENLARGE THE CALENDAR, JUST CLICK ON THE IMAGE.

TRUTH & CONSEQUENCE: Testimonials on Living with HIV

In commemoration of World AIDS Day, GRIOT Circle honors the lives of loving, inspirational and courageous souls who transitioned too soon, by passing forward the wisdom they imparted from their battle with HIV and AIDS.   Here, in their own words, we share an excerpt from the oral history project Without the Burden of this Secret The conversations on HIV/AIDS in the POC LGBT elder community today, bear many common threads to the sentiments and experiences in these interviews which occurred 20 years ago in New York City.

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LOUIS GRANT  ::  OPEN & OUT

I have lost a lot of friends to AIDS.  Too often I have thought that some unnecessarily allowed themselves to succumb to the disease.  They did not fight, they were not positive [minded] they accepted the diagnosis as a statement of impeding doom.  It seems to me that we black folk have moved slower in acknowledging the impact of this disease on our community.  Our people are suffering and dying because too often we are afraid to come out to our family…to our friends at a time when we need them most.  I think it’s very important to be out in terms of being a homosexual man and as a person with AIDS.  I’m out in every context: in my home, in my work situation.  I think carrying the burden of this secret, as so many of us do, when one has AIDS it just contributes to the illness.  It dos not make sense at this point in one’s life, when one needs to grasp all the life preserves one can, to not be open and out.  For me it’s another effective survival tool.”

Louis Grant

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JOE LONG  ::  SURVIVING DEMON DOCTORS

I was diagnosed with the HIV virus in 1989.  I was tested when I discovered a parotid cyst in my right cheek.  I was putting all kinds of solutions and compresses on it and it wouldn’t go down.  I finally decided to get to a doctor at New York Ear Nose and Throat.  The first thing he said to me was, “This is typical of gay fellas, why don’t you go take the test?”  Swollen glands and parotid cysts were nothing unusual, so I said I didn’t want to take the [AIDS] Test, I didn’t think that that was necessary, I wanted to see what we could do about the swelling, but he insisted.  So I did.  When I came back ten days later he told me my results were positive and to go get on AZT—as simple as that.  I asked if there was something he could do about the cyst.  He said that, I needed to find somebody who could put me on AZT.  He conferred with his partner and just left it like that. [Were they caucasian doctors?] A Jewish doctor and an East Indian doctor.  There was no pre- nor post-test counseling.  And when I asked for my records so that I could follow-up on the cyst, they directed me to the records department and said that I could take them to any doctor I’d like.  They didn’t offer to treat me any further.  So I was like in the street.”

Joe Long

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AGING IN AMERICA 2012 CONFERENCE

Aging in America, the 2012 annual conference of the American Society on Aging is the largest multidisciplinary aging conference in the country.  It is recognized as the leading platform for sharing knowledge, perspectives, best practices and replicable models that help participants enhance their skills and be more effective in their work with older adults.  There’s no better professional development opportunity for the people and organizations whose missions support quality of life and care for elders.

Who:  American Society on Aging
When:  March 28 – April 1, 2012
Where:  Washington, D.C.

For more details just click here–> www.asaging.org/aia12

JOIN GRIOT DAY-TRIP to ATLANTIC CITY on Dec. 6

TICKETS $40   PURCHASE DEADLINE: NOV. 22 

BUS PICK-UP at Bklyn YWCA at 30 THIRD AVE. at 7 am, Tuesday Dec. 6

ANY QUESTIONS PLEASE CONTACT:

MAXINE IRBY:  347-623-7686  

SANDIE GREEN:  646-578-9004 

ROBERT WALDRON:   718-246-2775

PHOTO GALLERY: THE FIRST CONVENING

Over fifty aging professionals gathered in Washington, D.C. on October 12-13, 2011 for the First National Convening of POC LGBT Aging Professionals hosted at the AARP Brickfield Center.

The idea of organizing a National Convening targeted to POC leaders of organizations and POC elders in the community to create a cross-cultural aging Network to promote LGBT POC aging on a national platform came during the American Society on Aging (ASA) LAIN (LGBT Aging Issues Network) Retreat held 2010 in New Mexico and sponsored by the Arcus Foundation.

From the meeting emerged The POC “Hot Spot” committee of LAIN to help address the gaps and help inform an inclusive practice for future educational efforts of ASA.

This Convening is an occasion for discussion and an opportunity to develop the strategies for building a common vision among LGBT POC professionals, activists and allies committed to aging issues.  The Convening has been realized and the work of building a formidable network for aging professionals who serve the POC LGBT community has begun.  Here, we share some outtakes from the first day of facilitated discussions and group workshops.  Subsequent posts on the GRIOT Blog will record and report on this historic event, and the outcomes.

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Photography by SeanDrakes.com

PHILLY CIRCLE OF FRIENDS HOSTS ELEGANT AFFAIR

WHEN:

October 15, 2011  –  8pm – 1am   Cocktail hour: 8pm – 9pm   Donation: $75

WHERE:

THE REGAL BALLROOM  5411 Oxford Ave, Philadelphia, PA 215-268-6005

INCLUDES:

Continuous Open Bar, Deluxe Buffet, Dancing (DJ), Valet Parking

FOR TICKET PURCHASES:

Member Contacts

Bobby Bryant  267-319-4772   |   Harriet Graham  215-224-5844

Skeets Spence & Emma Willis  215-659-0633

Cliff Fitzgerald  610-527-4087

Debbie Harrison  215-842-9730   |   Ken Soapes  215-208-9767

Tyrone Taylor  73-678-5036   |   Beverly Gilbert  732-446-5173

Circle of Friends  P.O. Box 858  Glenside, PA  19038-0858

For directions download flyer, just click here  –> ELEGANT AFFAIR 2011

Ask Our Doc: Treat Your Feet

By Dr. Kevin B. Coleman

Doctor of Podiatric Medicine,  New York State licensure

When people shop for shoes based on style or brand and how they fit with their outfit, instead of how shoes fit their feet, they’re setting themselves up for foot pain and discomfort.  Ill-fitting shoes that are too large or too small, and footwear with poor arch support are the prime agitators for foot problems.

For care of foot pain and discomfort turn to podiatrists.  These health care professionals must be licensed by the State to provide medical and surgical management of the lower extremity–which includes foot, ankle and lower leg.  They have the ability to diagnose systemic diseases and treat lower extremity manifestations.

The most common problems many podiatrists treat are toe nail disorders, such as ingrown, fungal or elongated nails, and hyperkeratoses (corns and calluses caused by tight shoes).  If you see a growth or feel discomfort make an appointment with a podiatrist for a proper diagnosis.  A visit usually includes an exam, a thorough assessment and treatment recommendations.

We are medically and surgically trained to help patients with these common foot problems.  Some of the reasons why people with such ailments seek assistance from a podiatrist are:

1]  Podiatrists are specially trained to trim corns and calluses.  When people try to cut their own calluses they run the risk of injuring themselves, which could lead to possible infection.  Having a professional do this can remove the chance of accidents.

2]  Some patients have inadequate vision or limited flexibility so they can’t reach their feet well enough to safely clip their nails, thus need a podiatrist to provide this service.

3]  Diabetes and poor circulation can also create the need for assistance from a podiatrist.

In between visits to your foot doctor, patients commonly use do-it-yourself pampering practices, such as warm water foot soaks, massage to help with foot discomfort and applying a favorite foot cream.

People with diabetes and/or poor circulation should have their feet evaluated every two months by a podiatrist.  Medicare, Medicaid and private insurance are commonly used to pay for podiatry services.  Next time, the Doc will offer steps to help diabetics walk in good health.

Walk lively, see your podiatrist regularly.

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Dr. Coleman has 25 years of experience, trained at New York College of Podiatric Medicine and is based in Brooklyn.  He can be reached at 231-846-8643 to address your questions and concerns.

Dekalb Market Launched

Looking to get all your shopping done for the week?  A new market close to Fort Greene highlights the best locally-grown produce and products in Brooklyn.

With over a dozen food vendors, an Internet radio station and educational farm, Dekalb Market, a project put together by Urban Space and located on Fulton Mall in Downtown Brooklyn, is looking to become a new sustainable hub for both retailers and the community at large.

Approximately 29 Brooklyn-based purveyors ranging from food vendors to retail stores will be on hand.  There will also be vendors from the Dekalb Farm offering options from educational classes on horticulture from Liberty Sunset Garden Center, to an incubator farm with eight plots.

TO READ MORE, CLICK HERE –> Dekalb Market Launches – Ft. Greene-Clinton Hill Patch.