Daily Archives: September 30, 2011

GRIOT Gratitude

 

INSIGHTS ON CONVENING OF AGING PROFESSIONALS – Post 4

In effort to provide insights, address questions and foster clarity around the function, expectations and importance of the upcoming National Convening of Aging Professionals, GRIOT Circle provides post #4 in this Q&A series.

Please use the comment tab at the bottom of this post to expand the discussion on this topic and present your questions.

WHERE CAN I WATCH OR READ A REPORT OF WHAT HAPPENS DURING THE TWO-DAY CONVENING IN D.C.?

Another intended outcome of the Convening will be written reports of all interactions, discussions, decisions, suggestions made there.  We’re having a team of volunteers who will ensure faithful and detailed transcriptions will be shared with our funder and the general public.  These documents will also be made available on GRIOT Circle’s website and Blog.

HOW DO I EXPLAIN WHY THIS CONVENING IS IMPORTANT TO MY PEERS?

As stated earlier, this Convening marks a historic moment in U.S. public health where the needs of the POC LGBT elder community will be addressed competently and openly.

WILL ISSUES FACED BY CAREGIVERS BE ADDRESSED AND SOLVED?

Absolutely! One major challenge to chronic health care disparities is provider cultural competency or lack thereof.  It’s easy to talk about promoting positive health behaviors and encouraging healthier lifestyles among the POC LGBT elders, but it’s quite another thing to translate this into language, tools and concepts readily accessible to this population.  Cultural competence, at the provider level and at the institutional level, is a key goal of education on POC LGBT aging health issues.  A provider’s lack of cultural competence has been shown to negatively affect not only provider-patient interaction and care-giving, but also the patient’s care seeking behavior.  Conversely, it’s a well established health care fact that the provisions of health care services that are respectful of and responsive to the health beliefs, practices and needs of diverse patients can help close the gap in health care outcomes.

Mind Your Own Life: Author Aaron Anson Discusses His Book

Author Arthur Anson. Photo courtesy Oliver Anson.

What is the overall message that you would like your readers to gain from your book?

My book is about engaging our own minds to seek and reconcile our own truths with God, or the source that created us all. It is not as important as we’ve been taught to give names to the unnameable, but more important to recognize that we came into existence instinctively knowing only love, and our beliefs and inherited prejudices were taught to us by others who in turn had those beliefs instilled and taught to them as well.

What can people 50 and over learn from “Mind Your Own Life”?

This journey back to love is one we can begin at any point in our lives. We cannot be held captive to the truths of others. We should reconcile for ourselves, and when we know a truth is inherently ours and agrees with us we should hold steadfast to our own knowing. We can acknowledge how we have passed down our own taught beliefs to others after us and how our inherited beliefs has affected our relationship with those we profess to love. If we can see where we came from, we can better understand where we are going and perhaps objectively encourage others more positively. More families, marriages and relationships have been destroyed in the name of religion then we care to admit.

To Read Full Story, Please Click Here –> Mind Your Own Life, Interview with Aaron Anson — AARP.